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Garlic

Widespread on Italian tables, garlic is undoubtedly one of the most important protagonists of Mediterranean cuisine. In addition to flavoring the most disparate dishes (it is used both in the preparation of meat and fish dishes and in cooking vegetables or to flavor sauces), garlic has very important beneficial properties whose influence on the human body is known for several decades now, confirmed by scientific and nutritional studies. Garlic is a herbaceous plant that does not need special care to grow and that can be found all year round; for this reason, it can be counted among the so-called "perennial" plants. The stem, rich in shrubs, culminates in bulbs branched into wedges which are the ultimate goal of its cultivation, the part that enjoys beneficial properties and that we use in the kitchen. Garlic is grown without difficulty throughout Italy, as it is a herbaceous plant that is very resistant to both frost and high temperatures. However, it does not tolerate dry environments: it is important that it grows in a humid environment, in fertile soils watered with a certain frequency but not excessively humid, since in this case fungi and other parasites could develop which would undermine its growth. Although it is often accused of being difficult to digest and giving a rather particular smell to the breath, garlic actually has antiseptic and refreshing properties that are fundamental for the human organism, combined with the ability to prevent certain pathologies. And just the effectiveness of garlic in the prevention of various ailments is the subject of recent scientific studies that increasingly enhance this plant.


The cultivation of garlic

Growing garlic in reality does not require any particular qualities, being quite easy in itself: just having a garden or a vegetable garden and constantly watering the plant. The best times to sow garlic are the end of winter / beginning of spring - i.e. the months of February and March - or the end of autumn / beginning of winter, i.e. the months of November and the first half of December. . The garlic must be sown in parallel rows, at a distance of about fifty centimeters from each other, making sure that the individual seedlings are at least fifteen centimeters away from each other, a space that the plant will need to branch out. In the cultivation of garlic, the so-called "trivalent" fertilizers are used, ie slow release, which are equipped with large quantities of potassium necessary for the plant. The ideal fertilization period is undoubtedly spring, while the depth of the bulbs must not exceed five or seven centimeters underground.

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