Fruit and vegetables

Root rot of the vine

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Vine root rot: identification

The root rot of the vine stems from the activity of some pathogens that attack the roots of vine plants. The microorganisms responsible for this disease are fungi belonging to various species, such as Armillaria (also called "nail"), Rosellinia necatrix (or "woolly rot"), Roesleria hypogaea and Phytophthora. Arimillaria, in particular, is one of the most widespread species: in fact, it has over forty different types all over the world. The mushrooms of these species prefer cold and humid areas and attack mainly live plants; in some cases, however, they also settle on dead wood. All species can act individually or can associate and give rise to multiple infectious processes that are extremely difficult to eradicate.


The damage produced on the plant

The fungal microorganisms that cause this problem act on the vital parts of the root causing its progressive deterioration. The fruiting bodies of the mushroom attack the root structure of the plant and develop rapidly, especially during the autumn season. Two factors contribute to the infectious process: the increase in the humidity rate due to frequent rains and the intrinsic weakness of plants weakened by the presence of a soil poor in nutrients. Facilitated by the humid climate, the mushroom proliferates rapidly without the plant being able to offer adequate defenses: this causes its progressive drying, since the roots, damaged by the disease, are no longer able to supply the plant with the nourishment it needs.

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