Fruit and vegetables

Vine mushrooms

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Vine mushrooms

Vine plants are commonly grown for the production of grapes, which can be eaten fresh or used for the production of wine; unfortunately, these plants can be affected by fungal diseases.

Anthracnose is caused by Gloeosporium ampelophagum. On the branches it creates round, depressed spots, with dark coloring and leathery consistency; the leaves have small dry areas with a purplish-black border. The berries affected by the parasite split and open the way for botrytis infections. Escoriosis is caused by Phomopsis viticola, affects the shoots of one or two years causing brown-purple colored areas, surrounded by notches of lighter coloring. The leaves have small necrotic spots of varying extension. Eutypa lata causes Eutipiosis. It is already noticed at the vegetative restart: weakened, short shoots, small leaves are the symptoms. The plant dies in 3-4 years.


Powdery mildew and other mushrooms

Powdery mildew is caused by the fungus Uncinula necator and with late blight it is certainly one of the diseases that are most dangerous for the vine. It causes bleached areas, covered with a whitish mold on the leaves that curl and twist. On berries it causes lattice lesions on the peel and also on the inside which determine their splitting. Downy mildew is caused by Plasmopara viticola, a fungus endemic to America and accidentally entered France around 1878 and then colonized the whole of Europe. On the leaves it causes, initially, the characteristic oil stains on the upper page, while on the lower one a whitish mold develops; then the dry leaf. The young shoots lose consistency and then necrotize, while the bunches dry out in bloom and necrotize when formed.

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