Fruit and vegetables

Cherry that does not bear fruit

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Question: cherry does not bear fruit

I have a three-year-old cherry tree and every year it blooms, the fruits are barely formed but immediately after they dry and fall. Precise that it is the only fruit plant. The other plants are garden ornamental. I would like to know the causes and remedies. Thank you


Cherry that does not bear fruit: Answer: Cherry does not bear fruit

Dear Michele,

fruit trees need to be of a certain age before they can effectively bear fruit; as regards peaches, apricots, plums, often still very young saplings, which are even only two or three years old, already produce some fruits (often only two or three); in the case of the cherry tree, however, it is a real tree, which, when ripe, can also become medium in size, that is, over 4-5 meters in height. These beautiful trees need to be planted for at least 5-10 years before they can bear fruit, depending on the species. In addition to this, while it seems that the other fruit plants are self-fertile, the cherry blossoms, although being hermaphroditic, tend to fail in pollination, unless there is another cherry tree nearby, which pollinates them. There are also self-fertile varieties, but usually this particular is reported at the time of purchase. Therefore, it is normal for your young sapling not to ripen any fruit; it could also be that it is a variety that needs a pollinator, and therefore also in the next few years you could find yourself with decidedly very lean harvests. In addition to needing another cherry tree near the first (in fact, two neighboring cherry trees have the function of pollinating each other, favoring larger quantities of crops on both trees), it is clear that the correct cultivation care is certainly a factor that improves the quantity and quality of the fruit. The fact that your young tree has already produced many flowers, is a clear symptom of the fact that he is in good health, and your care is the best possible.

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