Fruit and vegetables

Peeling of stone fruit

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Peeling of stone fruit

The peeling of stone fruit is a fungal disease that occurs with great frequency on peach, apricot and cherry, also present on plum and almond trees. It manifests itself as tiny holes in the foliage, as if the plant had been shot with a shotgun. Mushrooms attack the leaves, causing small dark spots, which die and fall as the days pass, leaving holes in their place. This mushroom is also called corineo, from its Latin name Coryneum beijerinckii, and can also attack the fruits and wood of the plants, causing showy branch cancers, from which rubbery exudate comes out. The fruits attacked by the mushroom show small dots, which also in this case produce exudate or change into plaques similar to dark, semi-woody cork. In case of heavy attacks, the plant can suffer a lot and the crop can be lost, in part or completely.


Biological cycle

As is the case with many parasitic fungi, the spotting of the stone fruits winters directly on or near plants, in the form of a mycelium or conid; it hides in the ravines of the bark, or under the dry leaves piled up near the plants, or in piles of straw or brushwood. When the warm season arrives, the conidia that have wintered under the bark or in the areas of branch cancers begin the production of spores, which thanks to the wind can reach all the foliage. They tend to prefer young and tender leaves, but do not disdain all the foliage, and also some areas of the bark. The development of the mushroom is continuous throughout the summer, especially if the climate is cool and humid, as generally occurs in spring and autumn. During the summer, the very dry and hot climate leads to a pause in the development of the mushroom, which resumes as soon as temperatures return to mild.

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