Apartment plants

Tillandsia cyanea

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Question: Now let's take care of her

I return to consult you, since I recently discovered the pleasure of taking care of silent friends, and I have a lot to learn! Thanks for the chance you give us, by the way !!! Now the friend to be saved is my tillandsia, which is drying out after flowering ... I see green tufts appear: how do I empirically practice the division of the plant, and place it on the trunk of my dracaena, if this is possible?


Answer: Now let's take care of her

Dear Vales,

tillandsias are epiphytic plants, that is, in nature they develop leaning against the troch of other plants, capturing the water present in the air, instead of that present in the soil, as happens instead for plants with a large root system; your tillandsia is a fine specimen of the cyanea species; this species of tillandsia has a rather particular vegetative cycle, as it develops a high and large inflorescence, consisting of pink bracts, from which some lilac flowers bloom. At the end of flowering, the inflorescence dries up, then also dries up the plant, producing basal suckers that will develop at the expense of the mother plant, which will die completely.

Now, the tillandsia that I saw in the photo still has a completely healthy inflorescence, in fact, it almost seems that it has yet to bloom, even if you don't see it well from the photos.

The general impression, however, is of a plant still healthy, adult, but not "passed off"; the dryness that can be seen at the apex of the leaves does not seem to be due to the next and sudden death of the plant that carries them; rather it appears to be an apical annoyance due to poor environmental humidity.

Because these plants develop in the rain forests, and are used to a much higher humidity than that found in the apartment; Before thinking about the division of the daughter plants, I would think of frequently vaporizing the mother plant, to bring it safely to the end of its days, without letting it dry now.

Gradually you will see that the plant will begin to perish, and the leaves will first lose their turgidity, then dry out; at this moment you will see new small tufts of rigid and turgid leaves appear from the base of the plant; I advise you to wait until these tiny leaf rosettes become a good size, before thinking about dividing them. Only when they are large enough will you be able to extract everything from the pot and divide the various tufts that have formed, which can be repotted individually.

If you want to grow a tillandsia hanging on another plant, I do not recommend this species of tillandsia, which should be placed in a pot to be able to grow it more easily. You can attach a tillandsia to the stem of your dracaena if it is completely devoid of root system, these are simply placed on other plants, or sometimes fixed with raffia or with rubberized wire, trying not to ruin the stems of the host plant.

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