Apartment plants

Dried lavender flowers

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Dried lavender flowers

Just remembering the splendid lavender plant immediately reminds us of its characteristic aroma. Not only that: its intense purple color reminds us of the image of the endless fields of Provence, the southern part of France, where its cultivation is intensive. It seems to see a sea with violet waves against an intense blue lacquered sky. Even our breathing, only to imagine lavender, becomes more open, calm; we feel healthier and, once again, we promise to plant a bush in our garden or just a pot on the balcony. You can't help it. This flower, for its innumerable qualities, as well as for its persistent scent that remains even when the flowers have dried out, has been in use with the ancient populations of the Mediterranean since ancient times: the first evidence has come to us from around 2,500 years ago, when Egyptians and Phoenicians used it to bandage and perfume their dead. Arabs and Romans immersed its dried flowers in the water of public toilets to perfume it and relax their limbs. The ear of the lavender flower was, and still is, considered a powerful amulet against the forces of evil; it is also said to be a talisman capable of recalling prosperity and fertility and, among the astral forces, it is combined with the astrological sign of Aries. The Greeks treated insomnia, back pain and preferred it for its calming abilities by hanging small bouquets on the ceiling of their homes in the form of aroma therapy. Lavender cultivation spread from the Greek islands of Hyires to Italy, France, Spain and then from there to England to the coast of North America.


Curiosity of the past

From Great Britain rumors reach us that Queen Elizabeth I liked lavender so much that it was preserved in bouquets full of perfume. She ordered that the flowers of this plant should never be missing on the royal table and ordered her gardeners to make sure that fresh lavender was available all year round. The Queen also drank a large amount of lavender tea to relieve her migraines and used it to perfume the body. Queen Victoria of England is also popular because in each of her rooms one could enjoy the scent of this ear: she used lavender to wash floors and furniture, freshen the air, and wanted to sprinkle it between the sheets. During the First World War, nurses bathed soldiers' wounds with compresses extracted from this plant. To this day, the French continue to bring the lambs to graze in the lavender fields, in this way their meat is more tender and fragrant.

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