Garden

Name of the hydrangeas

Pin
Send
Share
Send


The question of the name

The confusion about the name of the species or variety of Hydrangea begins very far in time. Certainly hydrangeas grown in their natural state or grown in Japanese gardens, some of which in turn came from China, already had proper names long before Western botanists became interested in them. Probably, however, the barriers represented by the diversity of language, contextual to the urgency of the "plant hunters" naturalists to identify and classify the imported varieties, prevented the transfer of names or their understanding. Thus new names were assigned and botanical descriptions soon executed, but hardly ever in unison. Over time, therefore, a rather uncertain situation arose which, although to a very small extent, still persists today due to the lack of an official and universally accepted classification. To this must be added the current tendency of some producers to rename, at their discretion, cultivars that actually have their own names, thus fueling the existing confusion. This is why rigorous botanical classification is not possible: it is possible to carry out a series of groupings either taking into account the main species, or on the basis of homogeneous characteristics (for example, H. petiolaris, H. anomala cordata, and H. seemanii which can be grouped together in the "climbing" group even though it is not a true botanical species) in order to facilitate the identification and identification of the individual varieties or cultivars available.


Hydrangea

The common name given to these plants takes origin from a denomination coined, in the mid-eighteenth century, by Philibert Commerson, a French naturalist who brought this particular flower to Europe from China.

Naturally, the genus is made up of several species, both shrubby and climbing plants, which have some common and other specific characteristics of the variety to which they belong.

All are characterized by the particular inflorescences that make these plants particularly recognizable.

Pin
Send
Share
Send